What tools and techniques help with the balance between sensitivities and alexithymia (not recognizing our feelings/sensitivities or suppressing them)? I discuss the relevant research and solutions.
Up to 80% of autistic children show differences in motor coordination, and autistic adults often continue to have challenges with motor control.
Many autistic people (40–65% or more) have alexithymia, a condition characterized by the inability to identify and describe emotions in the self, and several features commonly attributed to autism.
In this post, I have a look at the research literature on autism and pain sensitivity. Do autistic people indeed have a higher pain threshold?
Here we explore the research on the cerebellum and its particular functioning in autism, and how this affects motor control and cognitive functions.
3–5-year-old autistic children’s brains are as heavy as the average adult male brain! Read more to find out what the consequences are of our hefty brains.
There is a lot of research on how to decrease autistic symptoms. Here we approach it from a different perspective, and present ways to INCREASE our autism.
Autistic people are significantly more affected by sleep problems. In this post, we talk about sleep hygiene and other things you can do to improve sleep.
Alexithymia is a personality construct characterized by the inability to identify and describe emotions in the self. What does that actually mean?